Experiment 626. Twenty-five. "She" (technically cis-female but really gender-queer). Part of the invisible/forgotten B in LGBTQ. Aquarius. Fat and beautiful. Professionally involved in psychology and mental health. Feminist, activist, and advocate (which should go without saying, for everyone). Television show enthusiast. Obsessed with the 53 Disney Animated Features. ASOIAF reader. Ravenclaw.

All of my posts are queued and then randomized.

I run a Disney tumblr called disneyanalysis.

 

(1) President Abraham Lincoln, who had depression
(2) Writer Virginia Woolf, who had bipolar disorder
(3) Artist Vincent Van Gogh, who had bipolar disorder
(4) Writer Sylvia Plath, who had depression
(5) Mathematician John Nash (from A Brilliant Mind), who had schizophrenia

Inspired by this post

(Source: madvocate)

maliny-w-lecie:

Mentally ill people are not the problem.  Inaccessible, unaffordable health care is the problem. Stigma is the problem. Lack of treatment is a problem. Lack of understanding is the problem. Lack of compassion is the problem. Not taking people seriously is the problem. Lack of honest conversation and open dialogue is a problem. Using jails as a housing facility for mentally ill persons is a problem.  Do you understand me. Mentally ill people are not the problem.

Tesco pulls 'psycho ward' costume as consumer complaints mount

cyberunfamous:

together-we-will-overcome-ed:

This guy is a famous author of the book “forty days of purpose” whose son committed suicide a few months ago- he is an amazing advocate for ending mental illness stigmitization!

THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS

cyberunfamous:

together-we-will-overcome-ed:

This guy is a famous author of the book “forty days of purpose” whose son committed suicide a few months ago- he is an amazing advocate for ending mental illness stigmitization!

THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS

some facts you should know

laina:

  • eating disorders are not cute 
  • depression is not trendy
  • self-harm is not fun
  • mental illness is not an accessory
  • you do not want to suffer from something so destructive
  • there is no ”strange beauty” in illness
  • mental illnesses are not as glamorous as they are portrayed on television and tumblr

I was just thinking about this while watching The L-Word this week, because Shane’s internal struggle gets shown as some sort of mysterious beautiful thing for both the audience and the other characters to get off on.

I’m not sure how depression or anxiety appears sexy to people, because it sure as hell doesn’t feel sexy for those suffering with it.

When are we going to stop fetishizing everything?

disrespectyoursurroundings425:

writeroost:

Yesterday in one of my classes I got a student to come up and scribe on the board

And he was very careful about how he wrote on the board, like, making sure his handwriting was neat

And one of the students was like ‘LOL OCD’

And all of the students starting cracking up, so I was like

‘HAHAHAHA MENTAL ILLNESS IS SO FUNNY’

And everyone fell silent

yeah that’s what I thought

I love teachers on tumblr

redefiningbodyimage:

Ugh….these are unhelpful words
Why doesn’t our culture teach us to say caring things like 
“I know it seems like nothing is wonderful and everything hurts; but it won’t last forever and you are so much more than just frazzled nerves and leaky tear ducts. You’ll be a lot happier after I remind you why I love you, it’s okay that you forgot”

*I meant this for my personal blog, but it clearly resonated*

redefiningbodyimage:

Ugh….these are unhelpful words

Why doesn’t our culture teach us to say caring things like 

“I know it seems like nothing is wonderful and everything hurts; but it won’t last forever and you are so much more than just frazzled nerves and leaky tear ducts. You’ll be a lot happier after I remind you why I love you, it’s okay that you forgot”

*I meant this for my personal blog, but it clearly resonated*

If you don’t understand mental illness, good. Good for you. You shouldn’t have to understand.

If you don’t understand why some people can’t get out of bed in the morning, good. I hope you jump out of your bed every day ready to take the world by storm.
If you don’t understand how someone could drag a blade across their skin, or bruise themselves, pick, probe, burn, then good. I hope you’re never that desperate to feel something.
If you don’t understand what would drive a girl to keep starving herself despite everything she’s lost in the process, good. I hope you stay heavy and present and real.
If you don’t understand what eating everything in your kitchen only to throw it all up solves, good. I hope you always remember that it solves nothing.
If you don’t understand why he won’t just go to rehab or church or find someone who can help him, good. I hope you always remember you have somewhere to turn.
If you don’t understand how she can put getting high above her own children, good. I hope you never fall in love with a substance that only kills you in return.
If you don’t understand how someone can keep swallowing bottles of pills, tying knots in ropes, or standing at the tops of bridges, good. I hope you’re never that desperate for relief.
If you don’t understand how people do it, good.
You’re not supposed to.
It’s all fucking sick.
It’s all fucking mental.

When you say your prayers tonight, thank God for ignorance.
It’s healthy.

“If You Don’t Understand”  (via babyspooks)

(Source: adderalldust)

bru1se:

nothing scares me more than this.




I understand the feeling of becoming whole when we meet our “other half”. Though there are already problematic aspects of that belief, let’s say for a second that we are a half of a whole before we meet someone we love. Why should our loved one be responsible for “putting together” the half that we are? Why can’t we love ourselves enough to become as satisfied and happy a half as we can, before we meet the person who will fulfill us romantically?

I believe that we can be the person in distress and the knight in shining armor at the same time. We do not have to wait for our other half. It can be difficult and painful, (it most likely will be an extremely complicated journey especially for those of us who have both internal and external obstacles,) but our other half is there to support us and wipe the sweat from our brow. They are not there to hold us up so we can forget how to stand.

bru1se:

nothing scares me more than this.



I understand the feeling of becoming whole when we meet our “other half”. Though there are already problematic aspects of that belief, let’s say for a second that we are a half of a whole before we meet someone we love. Why should our loved one be responsible for “putting together” the half that we are? Why can’t we love ourselves enough to become as satisfied and happy a half as we can, before we meet the person who will fulfill us romantically?

I believe that we can be the person in distress and the knight in shining armor at the same time. We do not have to wait for our other half. It can be difficult and painful, (it most likely will be an extremely complicated journey especially for those of us who have both internal and external obstacles,) but our other half is there to support us and wipe the sweat from our brow. They are not there to hold us up so we can forget how to stand.

(Source: aladispute)

redefiningbodyimage:


Beatrice the Biologist Rocks
So I know this isn’t exactly on topic, but it’s related. My own body image issues were always complicated by my mental health issues, or maybe vice versa; but I can say nearing 30 with my anxiety and depression well mitigated has allowed my body image to blossom. It’s amazing how wonderful it is to wake up and not be disappointed about it, and it’s freed my brain to find beauty in the world, but most importantly, in myself.
This has a few important aspects for me. The fact that we don’t discuss injury to our psyche in the same way we do injury or illness to our body; the stigma of mental health treatment and counselling is such that we often don’t widely admit to mental illness, let alone have common language to discuss it with friends, acquaintances, and strangers.
But also the fact that it’s not socially acceptable to offer emotive care for people struggling with mental health issues. When a person has a physical ailment which hospitalizes them, they receive calls and cards and gifts and flowers; when a person has a need for psychiatric hospitalization it’s seen as shameful, spoken about only in whispers, and no one ever sends flowers. Rarely is it spoken about outside the family or immediate friends, and it’s never discussed without a great deal of stigma.
It’s so taboo to discuss, most lay-people don’t even understand the lexicon and definitions, let alone have any understanding as to how it impacts daily life, what it’s like to live with, or (most importantly) how to support loved ones who are suffering.
I’m gonna continue to do my part to destroy the same and stigma surrounding mental illness by being vocal about my own struggles, and raising the voices of others who are struggling, through my blog The Lame Dame. If you have a mental illness, talk about it; if you don’t, please still talk about it. End the Stigma.

redefiningbodyimage:

Beatrice the Biologist Rocks

So I know this isn’t exactly on topic, but it’s related. My own body image issues were always complicated by my mental health issues, or maybe vice versa; but I can say nearing 30 with my anxiety and depression well mitigated has allowed my body image to blossom. It’s amazing how wonderful it is to wake up and not be disappointed about it, and it’s freed my brain to find beauty in the world, but most importantly, in myself.

This has a few important aspects for me. The fact that we don’t discuss injury to our psyche in the same way we do injury or illness to our body; the stigma of mental health treatment and counselling is such that we often don’t widely admit to mental illness, let alone have common language to discuss it with friends, acquaintances, and strangers.

But also the fact that it’s not socially acceptable to offer emotive care for people struggling with mental health issues. When a person has a physical ailment which hospitalizes them, they receive calls and cards and gifts and flowers; when a person has a need for psychiatric hospitalization it’s seen as shameful, spoken about only in whispers, and no one ever sends flowers. Rarely is it spoken about outside the family or immediate friends, and it’s never discussed without a great deal of stigma.

It’s so taboo to discuss, most lay-people don’t even understand the lexicon and definitions, let alone have any understanding as to how it impacts daily life, what it’s like to live with, or (most importantly) how to support loved ones who are suffering.

I’m gonna continue to do my part to destroy the same and stigma surrounding mental illness by being vocal about my own struggles, and raising the voices of others who are struggling, through my blog The Lame Dame. If you have a mental illness, talk about it; if you don’t, please still talk about it. End the Stigma.

Depression is not selfish. Anxiety is not rude. Schizophrenia is not wrong. Mental illness isn’t self-centered, any more than a broken leg or the flu is self-centered. If your mental illness makes you feel guilty, review the definition of “illness” and try to treat yourself with the same respect and concern you would show to a cancer patient or a person with pneumonia.